Fast Facts & Figures

  • In total, 12 astronauts have walked on the moon. Of those, 6 have walked the floors of our museum including Neil Armstrong (Apollo 11), Buzz Aldrin, (Apollo 11), Alan Bean (Apollo 12) Charlie Duke (Apollo 16) , Eugene Cernan (Apollo 17). & Harrison Schmitt (Apollo 17).
  • Additionally, 16 Apollo Astronauts have been to our Museum.
  • ┬áBy 1969, up to 9,000 people were working on Project Apollo Lunar Module at Grumman.
  • The Lunar Module had four widely-spaced legs so it couldn’t tip over on the Moon and big footpads so it wouldn’t sink into Moon dust, (if existed).
  • It took 2 1/2 years to build each Lunar Module.
  • The Lunar Module was often referred to as “the moon bug”.
  • Grumman’s initial contract with NASA was to build six Lunar Modules, but this number was later increased to 18, nine of which were to fly lunar missions. The remainder were used for additional ground testing.
  • The Lunar Module was never flight tested because the lunar environment could not be replicated.
  • According to Joseph Gavin, VP of Grumman, “The request for bid on the Lunar Module was unique…in that it did not ask for a specific design. It was almost like a game of “Twenty Questions. You answer these questions and if we think you know what you’re talking about , well talk to you later.”
  • The advantage of the Grumman bid was with the engineering and manufacturing facilities, especially its clean room complex for vehicle assembly and testing.
  • In November 1962, NASA Awarded Grumman the Lunar Module contract in a competition with eight other bidders.
  • At its peak in 1968, about 7000 men and women worked at Grumman on the LM Program. This included approximately 3000 engineers, scientists, mathematicians and supporting technical personnel.
  • The LM-13, on display at the Cradle of Aviation Museum, weighs 8,600 lbs.
  • In an address to Grumman workers on September 17, 1969, Neil Armstrong said, “We didn’t come to make speeches, but just to congratulate you for your excellence and to thank you for giving us one grand spacecraft.”
  • The hatch way’s original shape on the Lunar Module was round but was redesigned as a square to accommodate egress and ingress due to the astronauts’ backpack shape.